Anyone tried cbd oil for anxiety

Anyone tried cbd oil for anxiety

One of our editors tried a bunch of non-psychoactive CBD products to help control her anxiety levels.

The first time I ever heard about CBD oil was on a podcast. Then I saw it on a drink menu. Soon it showed up on my favorite website, and as an add-on at my favorite matcha place. It reached the hands of my favorite Instagram influencers, and appeared as a new ingredient in my beauty products. So what is CBD, exactly?

It’s advertised as a miracle oil derived from hemp. When applied topically it’s meant to relieve pain. When you vape it, eat it, drink it, or droplet it into your mouth, it reportedly can help treat epileptic seizures, manage anxiety, chill you out or aid in going to sleep. Unlike marijuana, CBD doesn’t get you high. Some swear by its effects, but recently, there has been pushback against it. Some people have even called it “snake oil.” So does it actually work? I had to try.

First things first, I live in Los Angeles. The CBD trend hit both New York and LA, hard. It’s fairly easy to get your hands on CBD oil here — whether you’re popping into Moon Juice, Whole Foods, or even Urban Outfitters. Plus, this is 2019. You can order almost anything online.

Secondly, I have terrible anxiety. I think it is one of my defining characteristics (unfortunately). I am prone to anxiety attacks and I do take a prescribed medication when they become overwhelming. However, I tend to vibrate with nerves most of the time anyway (fun!). I have been trying to combat them with yoga and therapy, but taking an oil every day sounds like a faster fix (or a potential disaster), and at this point in my life I am game for anything!

Lastly, I don’t burn, bro. I don’t 420 blaze it. I’m high on life, baby! No judgement to anyone at all, I just don’t smoke weed. So I would like to reiterate, although CBD is a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, it is non-psychoactive and cannot get you high. I repeat, it is not THC. It will not get you high. Dad, are you listening?

I decided to start with Charlotte’s Web, the CBD oil brand I had heard about first on that podcast. I looked them up online and was absolutely shook by the prices of their tinctures. The most expensive one retails for $275 and the cheapest that I could find was $99 (Now they offer a $39.99 option, but they didn’t at the time). So, that’s one thing about most reputable CBD tinctures, they’re not cheap. Luckily, the next day I happened to be shopping at Bristol Farms (a California-based supermarket) and found some on sale for $60.

The brand offers various dosages, so as a first-timer I started with the lowest offered, which is their “Full Strength CDB Oil.” The bottle offers 6.65 milligrams of CBD per milliliter. The flavor was olive oil (although they do offer a Mint Chocolate version online).

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I had high hopes, but reader, I could not get past the taste. I am very sensitive to flavors, which is great for some things (like taste-testing Pringles) and bad for others I suppose. I could have tried mint, but honestly, I hate artificial mint flavoring. I abandoned this one after a few days despite the brand’s suggestion that I could put it in something like a smoothie, coffee or yogurt.

Also, I didn’t feel like it was doing anything to me! I had read that consistency is key, but I wanted to be consistent with something that didn’t make me gag when I smelled it — which honestly made me feel more anxious! Apparently, this product has worked for a lot of people. Great news for them! But it’s not for me.

While on my quest to find something tasty that I could take daily, I stopped by Moon Juice — which offers juices as well as coffees and matchas with adaptogenic “dusts.” My local shop offers CBD as a beverage add-in. The brand is still Charlotte’s Web, but they only offer the highest dosage.

I decided “what the heck” and ordered a CBD-infused iced matcha, hoping the flavor of the tea would conceal the olive oil taste. And it did! Not only was the drink tasty as always (I love Moon Juice and am not being paid to say this) but it made this warm feeling spread through my body like a non-sleepy calm, and this was only a single dose. But I wondered if it might just be a placebo effect. Was I just imagining this? Or had something changed?

After some light Googling, I found that the original dosage I had been taking wasn’t high enough. Apparently, the right dosage for your body is a total Goldilocks situation. You may have to try out a few different amounts before you get it just right. I wasn’t imagining things. The higher dosage actually helped.

Soon after, I was able to try a CBD oil tincture from another brand. Our editor-in-chief suggested I try Hawaiian Choice CBD oil, which she’d heard about through a former colleague in Hawaii whose husband launched the company. Their products come in a spray bottle. Each spray delivers 10 milligrams, and the company advises users take one to three sprays and hold it under their tongue for 30 seconds before swallowing. The bottle is expensive — $99, but it’s also flavored with passionfruit, pineapple, noni (a Polynesian fruit), and Big Island honey. Plus, it has a higher dosage than the first Charlotte’s Web product that I tried.

The particular tincture I tried is labeled “Active,” and the bottle says it’s meant to help with exercise and appetite control. It did nothing for my appetite (nor did I want it to) but the flavor situation here is a game changer. It tastes like candy. It also seemed to impact my anxiety levels in a major way. It worked!

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I tried CBD oil to help with my anxiety — and I’m still not sure that it worked

Jordan Michelle vapes a CBD oil made from hemp at the Cannabis World Congress Conference on June 16, 2017 in New York City. Billed as ‘the leading trade show and conference for the legalized cannabis, medical marijuana, and industrial hemp industries,’ the 4th annual conference brings together dozens of both small and large businesses involved in the growing hemp and marijuana market. Spencer Platt/Getty

  • Studies have shown that cannabidiol (CBD) can reduce anxiety in people with generalized social anxiety disorder.
  • Here’s author Jennifer Still’s experience of trying out various CBD products to help with her anxiety.

Generalized anxiety disorder affects more than 6.8 million people in the US, and one in six Americans are on prescribed psychiatric drugs to treat the condition or another mental health issue.

While I’ve never been officially diagnosed with anxiety, working in a high-stress job and being an anxiety-prone person means I have flare-ups that can leave me feeling tense, irritable, and generally unwell .

Thankfully, I don’t experience these episodes enough to warrant pharmaceutical intervention, but I did want to find a natural way to manage my anxiety when it does crop up.

After hearing positive things about cannabidiol (CBD) oil’s effect on our ability to relax and de-stress for those with generalized social anxiety disorder, I decided to give it a go. Here’s my experience.

I spent a lot of time searching online for a high-quality product.

I decided to start taking CBD oil while staying in the UK, which meant that I was looking for a product made and sold in this country to purchase. It’s a legal cannabinoid in the UK , which means it’s pretty readily available online and in health shops such as Holland & Barrett .

I eventually went with a brand called LoveHemp . To start, I chose to take CBD in oil form with a 10% concentration . This is pretty middle of the road in terms of dosage, with products available in as low as 2% and as high as 40% concentrations online.

It didn’t make me spaced out, and I didn’t feel ‘high.’

A lot of people get CBD, or cannabidiol, confused with THC , the latter of which is the psychoactive element in marijuana that gets you high. They’re definitely not the same.

CBD is a separate substance which contains no THC, so you won’t get high when taking CBD as a supplement. Instead, CBD contains compounds which have shown promise for medical uses , including relief from epilepsy, arthritis , diabetes , and anxiety .

One caveat: Many of these studies have involved marijuana strains that contain both CBD and THC. That means further research on CBD alone is needed.

After my first and any subsequent dosages, it didn’t change my state of mind at all. I wasn’t groggy, wired, excitable, or “high.” I felt just like myself.

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I experienced a subtle but noticeable difference in my anxiety levels.

While it wasn’t like I was 100% stress-free overnight, I did notice within a week or so of taking CBD oil — roughly six to eight drops under the tongue, held for 90 seconds and then swallowed, twice a day — that I felt less anxious and tense. Things that usually bothered me, like unanswered emails or things going wrong with work, were easier to take in stride.

It also helped that I was sleeping better at night. I hadn’t cut out caffeine or changed anything else about my lifestyle, so I can only attribute the improved ability to fall and stay asleep to the CBD oil.

However, studies have shown that CBD oil has no significant clinical effect on sleep patterns . Maybe it was a placebo effect.

I experimented with different forms of CBD until I found one that fit.

A woman uses a electronic vaporizers with cannabidiol (CBD)-rich hemp oil while attending the International Cannabis Association Convention in New York, October 12, 2014. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

While I started with CBD in oil form, the taste of the oil itself (usually hemp oil, but it can be purchased in coconut oil form as well) wasn’t that great. While I’m not a regular smoker, I have used a vape in the past, and although I know it’s not good for me, I do find the occasional smoke relaxing.

I was curious about the idea of vaping CBD oil, so I ordered a vape starter kit. I enjoyed it, but my paranoia about the dangers vaping poses to your health put me off the idea in the long run.

I also tried CBD gummies , though the lower concentration of CBD in each dose meant that I didn’t experience the same positive effects as I did with the oil. Eventually, I went back to the original 10% oil and have stuck with that ever since.

I still use it semi-regularly, though other lifestyle changes have likely helped as much in relieving my anxiety.

I always keep CBD oil around to take when I’m feeling in need of relief from my anxiety, rare bouts of insomnia, or even occasional back pain. I haven’t experienced any negative effects from taking CBD , and I definitely look forward to reading more research on its efficacy as it becomes available. I don’t take it daily, maybe just a couple of times a week now, but I like knowing it’s available should I need a boost (whether or not it’s the placebo effect ).

However, I’m also aware that other lifestyle changes I’ve made, such as improving my diet, taking more time away from work, and upping my exercise routine, have likely had just as much of a positive impact on my anxiety levels, so I don’t want to give the CBD oil too much credit.

Is it a miracle product? No, but if it helps people with certain ailments, why not give it a try?