Cbd oil for tic withdrawal

Cannabis Shows Promise In Treating Schizophrenia And Tourette Syndrome

Despite cannabis’ history in folk pharmacopoeias, clinical studies of its medicinal impact remain limited in many areas. Based on some promising early results, researchers are now calling for a closer look at its applications for certain mental health conditions for which more ‘traditional’ treatments have come up short.

According to recent studies, the cannabis-derived chemical cannabidiol (CBD) may offer meaningful relief with schizophrenia, a frequently chronic condition which can significantly interfere with how we think, feel, and behave.

At the University of Wollongong, researchers first discovered that CBD could provide new kinds of symptom relief for schizophrenic individuals by examining what science has uncovered about the chemical so far. To get a sense of CBD’s impact on cognitive function in relation to schizophrenia, Dr. Katrina Green, Professor Nadia Solowij, and Wollongong Ph.D. candidate Ashleigh Osborne conducted a detailed review of 27 extant studies on the chemical and uncovered some “fascinating insights” about its potential therapeutic value.

In a release, Green commented that CBD could provide direct neurological support for a range of conditions affecting the brain, from schizophrenia to dementia. “From this review, we found that CBD will not improve learning and memory in healthy brains, but may improve aspects of learning and memory in illnesses associated with cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease, as well as neurological and neuro-inflammatory disorders,” including hepatic encephalopathy, meningitis, sepsis, and cerebral malaria.

Green, who led the review, also noted that CBD may well be capable of reducing cognitive impairment that has been associated with THC, the main psychoactive component of cannabis, which has previously shown a potential to aggravate aspects of schizophrenia, anxiety, and other mental disorders.

Following the review, the researchers decided to put CBD’s potential for easing cognitive schizophrenia symptoms to the test with their own study using a rat model. With help from Senior Professor Xu-Feng Huang and Ph.D. candidate Ilijana Babic, w hat they found was that “chronic” administration of CBD seemed to attenuate the cognitive deficits and social withdrawal that often afflict persons with schizophrenia, which the team simulated in rats using prenatal poly I:C infection.

“We found that CBD was able to restore recognition and working memory, as well as social behavior, to normal levels,” Osborne said in a release. “These findings are interesting because they suggest that CBD may be able to treat some of the symptoms of schizophrenia that are seemingly resistant to existing medications. In addition, CBD treatment did not alter body weight or food intake, which are common side effects of antipsychotic drug treatment.”

Osborne also explained to ABC News Australia, “This is really important because current antipsychotic drugs don’t address the cognitive deficits, which approximately 80% of patients with schizophrenia experience.”

According to the Australian team, the results of their review and study indicate some promising possibilities for treating schizophrenia with CBD, but also that more scientific research is definitely in order.

“This is the first study to prove Cannabidiol can be used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia that aren’t addressed by current medications,” Osborne told ABC News. “These findings are really promising but further research is needed to see if these findings translate to people suffering from schizophrenia.”

She added, “Ultimately, we hope that these findings lead to new improved medications.”

According to a recent study on schizophrenia and cannabis use, p eople with a greater risk for schizophrenia are likelier than others to keep trying the plant for themselves in the meantime.

In recent years, cannabis has also shown promise as a treatment for Tourette Syndrome , characterized by involuntary physical or verbal tics that are often physically or socially painful to endure.

A preliminary study published this year provided a retrospective evaluation of cannabis’ effectiveness and tolerability in treating adults with Tourette Syndrome. Conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto with support from the Tourette Association of America, the study found that 18 of 19 participants were at least “much improved” after a regimen of inhaled cannabis, while tics scores for the whole group decreased by 60%.

See also  Cbd oil for 14 year old

As NORML reported, all of the study’s participants experienced “clinically significant symptom relief,” including reductions in irritability, impulsivity, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and rage outbursts. The drug was also well tolerated by the participants, with mostly minor side effects being reported.

Overall, the researchers wrote, “These study participants experienced substantial improvements in their symptoms, [which] is particularly striking given that almost all participants had failed at least one anti-tic medication trial. … In conclusion, cannabis seems to be a promising treatment option for tics and associated symptoms.”

As NORML pointed out, research has previously determined that oral doses of THC have helped to decrease tics and obsessive-compulsive behavior in patients with Tourette Syndrome by a hearty margin. Patients using inhaled cannabis, however, have “generally shown greater overall improvement.”

Given that cannabis and the chemicals it contains have demonstrated promise or proven effectiveness in treating such ailments as pain, nausea, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and various symptoms thereof, many patients and practitioners are hoping that the Trump Administration will allow more research on the plant going forward.

In recent months, however, members of the administration have indicated a desire to rather crack down on the drug’s medicinal and recreational usage, at times due to the opinion–or, perhaps more accurately, the notion–that marijuana is not a medicine.

According to Merriam-Webster, a medicine is “a substance or preparation used in treating disease;” according to our own CDC, medicines are ” used to treat diseases, manage conditions, and relieve symptoms.”

As the CDC points out, medicines can also contain a number of different drugs, and thereby pose different health risks depending on each patient. For example, over-the-counter (OTC) pain medicines like Tylenol and Excedrin contain the drug acetaminophen, which can easily be overdosed on (and/or do real liver damage) by doubling the dose once or twice, regardless of its interactions with other drugs, while over-dosing or incorrect use of OTC’s like Advil and Aleve, which contain drugs called NSAIDs, cause tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year, and thousands of deaths, though exact estimates vary.

Nevertheless, these drugs continue to be available as medicines because their perceived benefits are thought to outweigh the risks involved in taking them–an assessment which is critical for both doctors and drug manufacturers to perform, according to the FDA.

And since research and experts have consistently suggested that the potential benefits of cannabis would far outweigh the risks and side-effects involved–enough to warrant further study, in the very least–hopefully our elected officials and appointed administrators will realign their sense of the plant with science’s definition soon.

Is Medicinal Cannabis an Effective Treatment for Tourette Syndrome in Adolescents? A Pilot Study

This is a single site, pilot double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study of 10 participants comparing medicinal cannabis (THC:CBD 10:15 oil) with placebo in reducing tics in adolescents aged 12 – 18 years with severe Tourette Syndrome (TS).

The primary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate all elements of the study design (recruitment strategy, study duration, study procedures, study medication tolerance and outcome measures) to assess if they are acceptable and feasible for the conduct of a full-scale randomized controlled trial of THC:CBD 10:15 oil to reduce tic severity in adolescents with TS.

The secondary objective of this study is to collect preliminary data on the safety of oral THC:CBD 10:15 oil in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years with TS.

As an exploratory aim data from clinician- and parent-rated measures will be compared across the phases to explore for a signal of efficacy on primary (tic reduction) and secondary (premonitory urges, obsessive compulsive behaviors, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD] symptoms) outcome measures.

See also  Cbd oil for long hair

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Tourette Syndrome in Adolescence Drug: Medicinal cannabis (MC): THC 10mg/mL : CBD 15mg/mL, manufactured by Cann Group Ltd. Drug: Placebo Phase 1 Phase 2

Layout table for study information

Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 10 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Eligible participants will be randomized 1:1 to initially receive either THC:CBD 10:15 oil or placebo in Treatment Period 1, before crossing over and receiving the other study drug (THC:CBD 10:15 oil or placebo) in Treatment Period 2.
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Pilot Randomized Placebo-controlled Crossover Trial of Medicinal Cannabis (MC) in Adolescents With Tourette Syndrome (TS)
Estimated Study Start Date : January 2022
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 2023

Group A will receive medicinal cannabis during Treatment Period 1 (70 days), followed by a 7 day dose reduction and 21 day wash-out period, then will receive placebo during Treatment Period 2 (70 days).

Each 1mL contains 10mg tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),15 mg cannabidiol (CBD), and 0.004mL peppermint oil in medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil.

The placebo contains MCT oil and peppermint flavoring solution, which is indistinguishable from the active medication in appearance, smell and taste.

The dose will be matched for volume to the medicinal cannabis, and will follow the same dosing schedule as the medicinal cannabis treatment phase.

Group B will receive placebo during Treatment Period 1 (70 days), followed by a 7 day dose reduction and 21 day wash-out period, then will receive medicinal cannabis during Treatment Period 2 (70 days).

Each 1mL contains 10mg tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),15 mg cannabidiol (CBD), and 0.004mL peppermint oil in medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil.

The placebo contains MCT oil and peppermint flavoring solution, which is indistinguishable from the active medication in appearance, smell and taste.

The dose will be matched for volume to the medicinal cannabis, and will follow the same dosing schedule as the medicinal cannabis treatment phase.

    Rate of study participant recruitment, calculated as the time required to reach a sample size of 10. [ Time Frame: From the date of pre-screening the first participant until the tenth participant is randomized, up to 2 years. ]

The rate of recruitment will be calculated as the number of months from the date of commencing recruitment to the date of randomizing the tenth participant.

The number of participants who withdraw from the trial will be calculated as a proportion of the total number of participants randomized.

The number of participants who adhere to the protocol dosing schedule without medication related protocol deviations, treatment discontinuations or dose modifications will be calculated as a proportion of the total sample for each treatment condition (medicinal cannabis or placebo).

Medication compliance will be assessed through pharmacy calculations from returned bottle volumes. Acceptable compliance will fall within the range of 80-120%. The number of participants with acceptable medication compliance will be reported as a proportion of the total sample randomized.

The number of study visits attended by all participants will be calculated as a proportion of the total possible visits in accordance with the study protocol.

The number of study blood tests completed by all participants will be calculated as a proportion of the total possible blood tests in accordance with the study protocol.

The number of study questionnaires completed by all parents will be calculated as a proportion of the total possible questionnaires requiring completion in accordance with the study protocol.

The number of study self-report questionnaires completed by all participants will be calculated as a proportion of the total possible questionnaires requiring completion in accordance with the study protocol.

See also  Setting up to accept payments for cbd oil

Study design acceptability will be assessed using an evaluation questionnaire developed specifically for this study, which uses Likert scales to assess satisfaction with recruitment, medication tolerability, frequency of study visits, burden of completing questionnaires, and overall study quality. Parents will complete this questionnaire at the end of their study participation (day 197). Data will be reported for each item individually, as the proportion of parents who responded positively on the Likert scale, where higher scores indicate more favorable responses.

    The frequency of adverse events as reported on the modified version of the Liverpool Adverse Event Profile (LAEP) at day 71 and day 169 will be summarized across the medicinal cannabis and placebo treatment phases. [ Time Frame: Day 71 and 176 ]

Completed by the parent or guardian, the LAEP was designed to capture known side-effects of anti-epileptic medication. The modified version includes additional items to ascertain other known side-effects of medicinal cannabis. This measure includes 34 items. Adverse Events (AEs) reported on the LAEP will be considered significant if a 2-point increase in severity is reported from baseline to end of the maintenance dosing period (day 71 and day 176). The frequency of AEs meeting this criteria will be presented for the medicinal cannabis and placebo treatment phases respectively.

All possible adverse events will be recorded, as reported at study visits, during safety check phone calls and in between scheduled appointments. All Serious Adverse Events will be published, as well as all non-serious adverse events deemed by the investigators to be at least possibly related to the study drug. The frequency of these adverse events will be presented for the medicinal cannabis and placebo treatment phases respectively.

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

Layout table for eligibility information

Ages Eligible for Study: 12 Years to 18 Years (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
  • Males and females aged 12 – 18 years of age;
  • DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) diagnosis of TS as assessed by the study clinician;
  • TS severity defined as a score of 20 or higher on the Total Tic Severity section of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale;
  • No changes in either medication or other interventions in the 4 weeks prior to randomization, and intention to remain on same dose for the duration of the study;
  • Participant and family have the ability to comply with the protocol requirements, in the opinion of the investigator;
  • Agrees not to drive for the duration of the study.
  • Non-English speaking parents;
  • Participant history of psychosis, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder, or a family history of psychosis;
  • Taking anti-epileptic medications which interact with medicinal cannabis: clobazam, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors (e.g sirolimus, tacrolimus), anti-cancer agents, citalopram >20mg/day, escitalopram >10mg/day;
  • Abnormal liver function tests defined as ALT (alanine transaminase) > twice ULN (upper limit of normal);
  • Current use of illicit drugs or medicinal cannabis, or use in the 4 weeks prior to screening;
  • Pregnant or intending to become pregnant during the study, or breastfeeding;
  • History of clinically significant suicidal thoughts in the prior 12 months.

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT05184478